NOW ACCEPTING WEDDING RESERVATIONS!

CLICK & SAY HELLO TO SCHEDULE A TOUR

History of the Cowan Historic Mill

About the Cowan Historic Mill...

As the story goes, John Cowan - who was in his 30's - left his hometown of Acworth, Georgia in the late 1850's and traveled to the Black Hills of Montana with his two nephews Frank and Tom Cowan, John Boring, Bill Palmer and Henry Rusk from neighboring Forsyth County to seek his fortune in gold. Together they travel the wilderness looking for gold while they battle Indians, wild animals, weather, and other gold-seeking competitors.

After many months of prospecting with nothing to show for all their work, John Boring and Tom Cowan head home. Indians kill John Boring, and Tom Cowan makes it home. This leaves behind John Cowan, Frank Cowan, Bill Palmer and Henry Rusk. In the spring of 1864 they reach a tributary of the Missouri River in Montana, where a tired and very disheartened John Cowan told his men, "Boys, this gulch is our last chance,".

That very day they found a $20 nugget of gold.

While they were overcome by their crazed emotions and driven by their pursuit for gold, they were chased away from their digging by local Indians. Once they felt it was safe, they returned again to the site at "Last Chance Gulch" and prospected there for the next three years. History shows the group became known as the "The Four Georgians", and are credited with founding Helena, Montana. The "Last Chance Gulch" mine became one of the largest gold discoveries in the history of the United States. 

After the Last Chance Gulch discovery, John Cowan returned home to Acworth and built the mill in order to manufacture flour with friend Tarlton Moore. This three- story mill originally made very high quality flour called "Lynette Flour" and through the generations this mill manufactured flour, textiles and tapestries. The mill ceased commercial operations when it mysteriously burned in 1992.

The Cowan is Acworth's Oldest Commercial Building

The Cowan Historic Mill is Acworth’s oldest commercial building, built by John Cowan in the late 1870’s. It began as a flour mill, and later became a tapestry mill. Since that time, it has been several restaurants before recently being remodeled and reclaimed as an event venue with space for social gatherings and parties. 
 
The Mill has is able to host large weddings, receptions, catered affairs and presentations, has space for a dance floor and movable stage, and a exudes a “Classic Industrial Elegant” style with brickwork all around, exposed beams, and a grand chandelier hanging from the rafters